Adah Rose Gallery

Adah Rose Gallery showcases the work of contemporary artists of all medium. We feature duo shows in changing exhibits monthly. We also offer Salons, Zines, Music, Literary events and a lively place to come and talk about and create art. We will be posting event dates, artist bios, musings on the contemporary art world and fabulous places in DC to explore art. We are Francophiles and will be posting about the best places to visit in Paris.

Pop Up Bonobos Bethesda

ART VINO AND CHINOS

On April 23 and 24 we will be holding a Pop Up Art Show at a chic little men’s clothing store in Bethesda. Lives are busy, people often do not have time to visit galleries so we try a few times a year to bring  art to the people. We had a lovely group of artists bring their work down including Timu Richard, Zofie Lang, Tim Makepeace, Yar Kaporulin, Laurie Tylec and we were joined by artists Pat Goslee and Veronica Szalus.

Works are curated around the store and art mingles with shirts,ties, pants, suits and Chinos.  Among the additional artists included (always leaving someone out!..apologies)  are Elizabeth Grusin-Howe,Angela Kleis, Ian Doherty Jessica Drenk, Jessica van Brakle, Suzanne Yurdin, Brian Dupont,Chris Chernow, Mei Mei Chang, Joan Belmar, Lori Anne Boocks, Susan Stacks, Laila Jadallah, Jessica Rose, Esther Hidalgo, Sidney Lawrence, Ray van Santen, Carol Zilliacus, Carol Rubin, Joyce Mc Carten, Elizabeth McNeill Harris, D.B. Stovall, Chris Trueman, Brian Dupont, Trix Kuijper, Carolee Jakes, John James Anderson, Kate Brooks, and countless others.

Join us if you can for our next Pop Up…to be decided soon…

We are so proud and excited for gallery artist Chris Trueman who was recently reviewed in the Huffington Post for his show in Los Angeles. Chris’ wonderful work can always be found at our gallery as well.

Here Follows the Review by Priscilla Frank

"Somewhere between a computer screen saver, a journey to find your spirit animal, and a car window streaked with rain, you’ll find Chris Trueman's electric abstract canvases.

The enchanting works, made from acrylic and acrylic spray paint, combine various threads of abstraction for a unique experience that combines the historical debates of painting with a fast-paced sharpness perfect for the short attention span of the internet generation.

Combining soft and hard strokes with warm and cool colors, Trueman creates multilayered works thick with contradiction and complexity. We reached out to the California painter to learn more about his upcoming exhibition, “Beneath the Skin.”

Your artistic style features a visual collision of competing schools of abstraction, from AbEx to Op Art. How would you define your style without reference to these other modes? My artistic style is about constructing something new out of the parts and pieces of systems and modes that at one point were ideologically isolated philosophies. The reason I have currently gravitated to Ab-ex and OP wasn’t because of their place in art historical context, but because the experience of them was so opposing. Ab-ex was a sort of transmission, a nonverbal message through the paint itself, and OP was so much more of a reflection about the body of the viewer and how experiencing OP art made you realize that your perceived world wasn’t as stable as it seemed. Perception depends on things staying still.

By combining these modes you get a transmission lost in the reflection or a persistent presence in your otherwise pleasurable visual stimulus. I make paintings based on the premise that the sum of two contradicting experiences does not cancel out but creates a whole separate experience unto itself. There are a number of other references in the work such as graffiti, street art, computer graphics, 3D modeling, fashion and also various types of space — illusionistic space, a flattened “abstract” space, space based on series of overlapping layers that act like a screen or photoshop space, physical and textural space. I’m mining the history of painting and visual culture to take advantage of what these diverse modes and processes can do and what the experience of them is.

Walk us through your process. How do you begin a work and how do you know when it is finished? My process begins on a raw canvas, I start by painting gesturally, with brushes, squeegees, and a variety of tools. The second layer is often a process of masking and spraying with an acrylic based spray paint. In this process I have to start building backwards, because the negative space is what will show through. Sometimes the spray is solid, at other times it allows the previous layer to show through, sometimes the masked layer covers the whole surface, sometimes just parts of the painting.

The interesting thing about using the acrylic spray paint is that it adheres differently to the various surfaces, so the areas with the underlying gesture the spray is more solid, whereas the areas of raw canvas, the paint doesn’t adhere as well. This ends up merging the layers, rather than a flat even graphic layer on top of a gestural painting, the graphic layer takes on the shapes and forms of the underlying layers. I then repeat this back and forth, more gestural painting, sometimes staining by watering down the acrylic paint and then back to the masking and spraying. What makes this body of work different than the previous bodies of work is that the gesture comes back to the top, before the final layer was a masked and sprayed layer.

I know it is finished when there is a tension and balance between the forms, even though I work somewhat intuitively in the process, I start out with an idea of what the work will more or less look and act like in the end and I can see when I have accomplished my objectives while maintaining a freshness.

How, if at all, has California contributed to your aesthetic?I think California has been a big influence — the color, the light, the amazing history we have here have all contributed in some way to my paintings. I also like it when there is a sense of place that comes through in the work. You can see a Berlin aesthetic in work coming from Berlin and it is tied to the ideas that are circulating. The same happens here, there is a youthfulness and a boldness that I see in a lot of LA-based work. I also think that Hollywood and the movie industry can play a role in the work that is made here, a cinematic quality.

What’s your biggest distraction from working?I am very fortunate to not have too many distractions from working. My wife is very supportive, we have a 16-month-old daughter Luca that I love to spend my time with and I teach at Fullerton College and Santa Ana College a few days a week, but I wouldn’t call either of these a distraction. I love spending time with my family and I get a lot out of teaching, it keeps me sharp, on my toes and thinking about why I make the decisions I make in own artwork.

Nothing makes you think about your process and ideas more than having to explain it to a student. I have a really dedicated studio practice and get into the studio at least five days a week. I have also been traveling quite a bit for art fairs and shows, I think the travel is probably what pulls me out of the studio the most but it is so important to me to see what else is going on out there and I enjoy showing my work actively.

Jessica Drenk, Soft Cell Tissue

Fleshy hives
deep black eyes
bound and browned
lovely-strange fibrous twins

Seth Dorcus MICA 2014

Jessica Drenk, Soft Cell Tissue

Fleshy hives

deep black eyes

bound and browned

lovely-strange fibrous twins

Seth Dorcus MICA 2014

Reading Our Remains
Jessica Drenk
A book is a wonderful thing.  I always look at books one page at a time, but this work by Jessica Drenk lets me see the many layers of an antique tome simultaneously.  It is simply incredible how the excavated pages and text of the book create such intricate  patterns and textures.  Much like her works with PVC piping, this piece transforms, or perhaps reveals, qualities of the medium which mirror the natural world.  The book becomes a fossil- both in terms of its agedness and its petrified appearance.  

Seth Dorcus     MICA  2014

Reading Our Remains

Jessica Drenk

A book is a wonderful thing.  I always look at books one page at a time, but this work by Jessica Drenk lets me see the many layers of an antique tome simultaneously.  It is simply incredible how the excavated pages and text of the book create such intricate  patterns and textures.  Much like her works with PVC piping, this piece transforms, or perhaps reveals, qualities of the medium which mirror the natural world.  The book becomes a fossil- both in terms of its agedness and its petrified appearance.  

Seth Dorcus     MICA  2014

Erosions
Jessica Drenk


In this piece there is less distinction between the natural and the manufactured.  The work is manufactured, to be sure, but its form belies the fact.  Plastic piping would typically seem the furthest thing from the world of nature - though not in this case.  At once we see synthetic material and organic beauty, indoor plumbing and coral reef.  And what is most fascinating perhaps, is that it is neatly framed (“contained” even) and presented for the viewing.  Such a beautiful and paradoxical phenomenon hangs here right here on the wall before me- like some kind of magic.  
Seth Dorcus 2014

Erosions

Jessica Drenk

In this piece there is less distinction between the natural and the manufactured.  The work is manufactured, to be sure, but its form belies the fact.  Plastic piping would typically seem the furthest thing from the world of nature - though not in this case.  At once we see synthetic material and organic beauty, indoor plumbing and coral reef.  And what is most fascinating perhaps, is that it is neatly framed (“contained” even) and presented for the viewing.  Such a beautiful and paradoxical phenomenon hangs here right here on the wall before me- like some kind of magic.  

Seth Dorcus 2014

Alan Steele

Modern Equipment #89 (2012)


Something emerges from this arrangement.  A quiet harmony- between the clean,  delicate format and densely busy linear marks.  It is difficult to say whether or not the orange in the center advances or recedes.  Likewise the fluted paper surface at right adds a subtle three-dimensionality, but it is unclear how…

Peculiar, it might be a doorway, opening toward us.  It might be a machine, some maze-like mechanism.  Hints of text are visible but illegible.  We are left with a beautiful enigma, like life itself.  

Seth Dorcus

Mica 2014

Alan Steele

Modern Equipment #89 (2012)

Something emerges from this arrangement.  A quiet harmony- between the clean,  delicate format and densely busy linear marks.  It is difficult to say whether or not the orange in the center advances or recedes.  Likewise the fluted paper surface at right adds a subtle three-dimensionality, but it is unclear how…

Peculiar, it might be a doorway, opening toward us.  It might be a machine, some maze-like mechanism.  Hints of text are visible but illegible.  We are left with a beautiful enigma, like life itself.  

Seth Dorcus

Mica 2014

In “REFRESH” by Suzanne Yurdin, bold browns, blues and yellow ochres, painted using large planes and overlapping lines and grids create a beguiling abstract landscape.  Suzanne has worked in both Provence in France and Tuscany in Italy to capture the geology, the topography and the brilliance of the color in these two seductive regions where painters through art history have drawn inspiration

In “REFRESH” by Suzanne Yurdin, bold browns, blues and yellow ochres, painted using large planes and overlapping lines and grids create a beguiling abstract landscape.  Suzanne has worked in both Provence in France and Tuscany in Italy to capture the geology, the topography and the brilliance of the color in these two seductive regions where painters through art history have drawn inspiration

Yvette Kraft
Rata Scoo
A few blue lines create a character, one presumably named “Rata Scoo.”  
In this small drawing, a handful of marks coalesce to form a portrait.  “Less is more” is the adage that comes to mind, and in the case of Kraft’s drawing, the words ring true.   Who is Rata Scoo?  Words won’t suffice to say, no matter how deliberate.  But words aren’t necessary, not with these few blue lines.  Who is Rata Scoo?  I can’t say, but I don’t need to - just look.

Seth Dorcus   

MICA 2014

Yvette Kraft

Rata Scoo

A few blue lines create a character, one presumably named “Rata Scoo.”  

In this small drawing, a handful of marks coalesce to form a portrait.  “Less is more” is the adage that comes to mind, and in the case of Kraft’s drawing, the words ring true.   Who is Rata Scoo?  Words won’t suffice to say, no matter how deliberate.  But words aren’t necessary, not with these few blue lines.  Who is Rata Scoo?  I can’t say, but I don’t need to - just look.

Seth Dorcus   

MICA 2014

Pat Goslee

Painting is a healing and holistic act for Pat Goslee; it allows her to internalize exterior pain and pleasure, processing both into compassion and works of art. In her newest series of works on canvas, Pat mines her subconscious and uses her intuition to convey inner realities. Pat’s ideas straddle the disciplines of science, metaphysics and philosophy. She works to create comforting spaces and vibrant energy in each of her works. She often utilizes patterns, including materials dripped in paint and applied directly to the canvas, to create systems that describe how we store information and knowledge. Pat’s paintings are a way of visualizing and transmitting vitality. In her paintings, one sees everything from a beating heart, secret worlds, inner beauty, machines and microscopic organisms. Her palettes are both beautiful and sensitive, serving as a perfect complement to her personal ideology. 

Pat Goslee is a DC-based painter. Pat received her BFA from the University of Georgia and her MFA from Catholic University. Pat has exhibited in many group and solo shows, most recently at Studio 1469, the National Institutes of Health, the DCAC. McLean Project for the Arts, Hillyer Art Space, Doris Mae Gallery, Addison Ripley Fine Art and the Washington Project for the Arts. She serves on the Artist Advisory Board at Hillyer Art Space and has curated numerous shows in the DC metropolitan area. 


Jessica Van Brakle

Cranes - silent yet strong, masculine yet delicate - dominate the contemplative landscapes of Jessica Van Brakle. An homage to her grandfather’s work in construction, the cranes build networks of intricate, expansive lines. In her newest paintings, Jessica’s landscapes have become  more abstract and decorative. On close examination we see the same botanic motifs mixing with new domestic elements. Nature seems to blossom out of the mechanical, resulting in a refined and harmonious whole. The paintings are like fine Wedgwood China; elegant, ornamental and graceful. While the paintings might appear symmetric, Jessica allows the paint to drip and flow, disrupting the apparent perfection. We see a new Rococo influence in her work in addition to her older influences of 19th Century Romantic Landscape painting and photography. 

Jessica Van Brakle is a Maryland-based painter with a studio at the Arlington Art Center. She received her BFA from the Corcoran College of Art & Design in Painting. Jessica is a former Hamiltonian fellow, a recipient of an Individual Artist Grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, and in 2008 was a finalist for the Trawick Prize. Her most recent exhibitions include shows at the Arlington Arts Center, McLean Project for the Arts, Bäckerstrasse 4 in Vienna Austria, Hamiltonian Gallery, Countdown Temporary ArtSpace, in Bethesda, and Silber Gallery at Goucher College, as well as numerous group shows in the DC area. 

 There is something so utterly human, so astoundingly powerful in visiting a museum and standing before a marble sculpture from Greco-Roman times.  I feel so privileged and awed to be in a room with sculpture that is over 2000 years old. I feel a profound connection to the artist who created the sculpture and to the work itself.  My mind tries to recreate the space of the workshop where the artist might have worked, to imagine the personality of the model, to think of the relationship between artist and inspiration.

Standing alone in one of the rooms of the National Gallery of Art in DC or the Louvre in Paris is an amazing pleasure. I often find myself alone, gazing at the anatomy, musculature and carving of a soldier, slave or goddess.  How could the anonymous artist have possibly imagined the solace and enjoyment their art would provide through the millennium?  I am reminded of the vulnerability of us all and of our capacity for immortality through the arts.