Adah Rose Gallery

Adah Rose Gallery showcases the work of contemporary artists of all medium. We feature duo shows in changing exhibits monthly. We also offer Salons, Zines, Music, Literary events and a lively place to come and talk about and create art. We will be posting event dates, artist bios, musings on the contemporary art world and fabulous places in DC to explore art. We are Francophiles and will be posting about the best places to visit in Paris.
Here is a photograph of one of the walls Seth, Schuyler and I curated for the Summer show which is currently up in the Gallery.  When curating this wall, we were thinking about color, textures and interactions between artworks.  Starting on the lefthand side, we compiled smaller works of Pat Goslee and Ellyn Weiss.  This arrangement of smaller works keeps the eye busy jumping from square to square.  We paired these works with Brian Dupont’s Pipe Piece which brings the art even further off the wall.

Continuing our theme of vivid blacks and bold marks, we placed Joan Belmar’s work next to Nancy Frankel’s metal floor sculpture.  These pieces respond very well next to each other because they all have such strong textures which further enhance each piece.

As your eye continues down the wall, we brought in an element of Japanese art with Freda Lee McCann and Allen Steele.  Both works contain Japanese writing.  McCann’s landscape painting brings out the pinks in Brian and Pat’s work.  Below Alan Steele’s painting we have one of Mei Mei Chang’s mixed media works.  Mei Mei’s jagged edges and diverse materials give a nice transition into my abstract silver gelatin photograms paired with tiled photographs.  Lastly, we have Susan Stack’s gold circular pen on paper piece.  This gold color ties the rest of the wall together as you continue further to the right.  To see more pictures of the show, visit AdahRoseGallery.com

Hannah Chertock

VCU 2016

Here is a photograph of one of the walls Seth, Schuyler and I curated for the Summer show which is currently up in the Gallery.  When curating this wall, we were thinking about color, textures and interactions between artworks.  Starting on the lefthand side, we compiled smaller works of Pat Goslee and Ellyn Weiss.  This arrangement of smaller works keeps the eye busy jumping from square to square.  We paired these works with Brian Dupont’s Pipe Piece which brings the art even further off the wall.

Continuing our theme of vivid blacks and bold marks, we placed Joan Belmar’s work next to Nancy Frankel’s metal floor sculpture.  These pieces respond very well next to each other because they all have such strong textures which further enhance each piece.

As your eye continues down the wall, we brought in an element of Japanese art with Freda Lee McCann and Allen Steele.  Both works contain Japanese writing.  McCann’s landscape painting brings out the pinks in Brian and Pat’s work.  Below Alan Steele’s painting we have one of Mei Mei Chang’s mixed media works.  Mei Mei’s jagged edges and diverse materials give a nice transition into my abstract silver gelatin photograms paired with tiled photographs.  Lastly, we have Susan Stack’s gold circular pen on paper piece.  This gold color ties the rest of the wall together as you continue further to the right.  To see more pictures of the show, visit AdahRoseGallery.com

Hannah Chertock

VCU 2016

I have to admit, “The Spell” by Chandi Kelley grabbed me from my first day at Adah Rose Gallery, and not for the normal “high brow” art analysis reasons. Growing up, there were very few things I loved more than unicorns, witches, and fantastical worlds filled with magic. Now, botanical prints like the wallpaper in this photograph fill my own decor.  Needless to say, this was a very personally, individually pleasing piece.
However, the more I have stayed with this photograph, the more I find thoughtful and subtle layers to this playful piece.
Visually, it’s a study in how a symmetrical, balanced composition can stay dynamic when the artist applies the rule of thirds. (The rule is easy shorthand for the principal of keeping elements in a piece along invisible lines that divide the composition into thirds both horizontally and vertically.) The different poses in the two unicorn bookends keep a sense of movement by not being too perfectly symmetrical. The bright, high contrast pattern in the background adds further visual dynamism.
Intellectually, the photograph is a portrait without being a portrait. Domestic environments can be just as revealing about their owner as that owner’s face, and this photograph does a wonderful job of capturing an aspect of that person’s 
Schuyler Krogh Kenyon Colllege 2015

I have to admit, “The Spell” by Chandi Kelley grabbed me from my first day at Adah Rose Gallery, and not for the normal “high brow” art analysis reasons. Growing up, there were very few things I loved more than unicorns, witches, and fantastical worlds filled with magic. Now, botanical prints like the wallpaper in this photograph fill my own decor.  Needless to say, this was a very personally, individually pleasing piece.

However, the more I have stayed with this photograph, the more I find thoughtful and subtle layers to this playful piece.

Visually, it’s a study in how a symmetrical, balanced composition can stay dynamic when the artist applies the rule of thirds. (The rule is easy shorthand for the principal of keeping elements in a piece along invisible lines that divide the composition into thirds both horizontally and vertically.) The different poses in the two unicorn bookends keep a sense of movement by not being too perfectly symmetrical. The bright, high contrast pattern in the background adds further visual dynamism.

Intellectually, the photograph is a portrait without being a portrait. Domestic environments can be just as revealing about their owner as that owner’s face, and this photograph does a wonderful job of capturing an aspect of that person’s 

Schuyler Krogh Kenyon Colllege 2015

Thunder and Mist
Freda Lee McCann’s work, “Thunder and Mist,” pays homage to a rich and vast tradition of Chinese landscape painting (termed “shanshui” or “mountains and waters”)while reinterpreting it for contemporary times.  Her techniques are recognizable but new.
The white mist, traditionally called “flying white” and used to allow space for qi to flow and mountains to breathe, was typically created through carefully leaving areas of the painting blank. Here, Freda instead uses watercolor and rice paper, a technique that gives these spaces a new texture and depth.
Her training and skill as a traditional calligrapher are evident in every line of the work. The calligraphic lines of the soaring mountains create energy and movement, while what at first appears to be foliage is really a display of gestural ink work and beautifully wrought Chinese characters.
Additionally, Freda incorporates scraps of phonebook pages on which she practiced her calligraphy. These pieces offer a glimpse into the painstaking practice and repetition necessary to join an art tradition that once taught its students through having them copy all of the great masters who came before. Now, that practices becomes a visual and textural layer of her painting.
-Schuyler Krogh, Kenyon College ’15

Thunder and Mist

Freda Lee McCann’s work, “Thunder and Mist,” pays homage to a rich and vast tradition of Chinese landscape painting (termed “shanshui” or “mountains and waters”)while reinterpreting it for contemporary times.  Her techniques are recognizable but new.

The white mist, traditionally called “flying white” and used to allow space for qi to flow and mountains to breathe, was typically created through carefully leaving areas of the painting blank. Here, Freda instead uses watercolor and rice paper, a technique that gives these spaces a new texture and depth.

Her training and skill as a traditional calligrapher are evident in every line of the work. The calligraphic lines of the soaring mountains create energy and movement, while what at first appears to be foliage is really a display of gestural ink work and beautifully wrought Chinese characters.

Additionally, Freda incorporates scraps of phonebook pages on which she practiced her calligraphy. These pieces offer a glimpse into the painstaking practice and repetition necessary to join an art tradition that once taught its students through having them copy all of the great masters who came before. Now, that practices becomes a visual and textural layer of her painting.

-Schuyler Krogh, Kenyon College ’15

Five Things You Have to Do if you Visit Paris

1. Wander in the Marais and marvel that this part of the city was saved including the beautiful Hotel Particuliers.  Enter the most grand of them all..Les Archives.  

2. Stroll through the courtyards of the Louvre at night, the illuminations are so startling and romantic and there is sure to be a classical music troupe playing for your enjoyment. Tip them to be sure.

3. Visit Shakespeare and Co. along the banks of the Seine. Leave a rendez vous note for a loved one, buy a book or novel about Paris and if you are lucky, stay to hear an inspiring writer talk about their work. In July the NYU in writing program offers a host of readings.

4. Walk along the Quai on the Left Bank to read the elegant signs remembering the famous who have lived in Paris “Ici a vecu” including this romantic quote by Baudelaire. La Crepescule

5. Find an Yves Klein painting and alllow yourself to be absorbed by the sensuous and soothing blue…a color favored in Paris in doorways, fabrics et le ciel. 

"WAVELENGTHS: A POETIC SYNTHESIS OF SOUND AND ART"MATT CORRADOJUNE 12-JULY 13, 2014 OPENING VERNISSAGE SATURDAY JUNE 14 6:30-8:30 P.M.
ABOUT THE ARTIST

Skateboarding, Rock and Roll, Comic Books, Anime, Jazz, Pop Music, Fashion, Street Art and Architecture have all served as influences in the art and music of Matt Corrado. Matt is an interdisciplinary artist whose exhibit includes a site specific ambient sound installation incorporating many influences from the world of popular culture. The exhibit also examines  the many cultural contexts of the idea of “Wavelengths”.  A wavelength can be a measure of the distance between repetitions of a shape or sound. It includes peaks, valleys and a variety of modulations, all evident in Matt’s work. The sound installation incorporates  dialogues and monologues of people discussing wavelengths on a scientific level as well as on a linguistic and cultural one. The interaction between the electronic music and the visual work’s graffiti aesthetic creates a dialogue around the multimedia nature of today’s art.  ”Are we on the same wavelength” has come to mean a sense of sympathy, empathy and rapport..all themes in Matt’s visual and musical work.  Matt composed music for and played on the sound installation and is joined by the musical talents of Sean Gaiser and Jarrett Nicolay. The exhibition also includes paintings and drawings exploring themes of hype, integrity, humor, discipline, money, truth and parenthood.Matt Corrado graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design. His work ranges from fine art, illustration and digital media. Matt is a musician. composer, music promoter and part owner in a recording studio. Matt has designed clothes, curated art, shown in numerous exhibits, created murals, managed bands, recorded music and is a true Renaissance Artist of our times. Matt’s generation has embraced technology and with it the ability to perform and create across disciplines and to appeal to a broad idea of what is art.

"WAVELENGTHS: A POETIC SYNTHESIS OF SOUND AND ART"

MATT CORRADO


JUNE 12-JULY 13, 2014 OPENING VERNISSAGE SATURDAY JUNE 14 6:30-8:30 P.M.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Skateboarding, Rock and Roll, Comic Books, Anime, Jazz, Pop Music, Fashion, Street Art and Architecture have all served as influences in the art and music of Matt Corrado. Matt is an interdisciplinary artist whose exhibit includes a site specific ambient sound installation incorporating many influences from the world of popular culture. The exhibit also examines  the many cultural contexts of the idea of “Wavelengths”.  A wavelength can be a measure of the distance between repetitions of a shape or sound. It includes peaks, valleys and a variety of modulations, all evident in Matt’s work. The sound installation incorporates  dialogues and monologues of people discussing wavelengths on a scientific level as well as on a linguistic and cultural one. The interaction between the electronic music and the visual work’s graffiti aesthetic creates a dialogue around the multimedia nature of today’s art.  ”Are we on the same wavelength” has come to mean a sense of sympathy, empathy and rapport..all themes in Matt’s visual and musical work.  Matt composed music for and played on the sound installation and is joined by the musical talents of Sean Gaiser and Jarrett Nicolay. The exhibition also includes paintings and drawings exploring themes of hype, integrity, humor, discipline, money, truth and parenthood.

Matt Corrado graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design. His work ranges from fine art, illustration and digital media. Matt is a musician. composer, music promoter and part owner in a recording studio. Matt has designed clothes, curated art, shown in numerous exhibits, created murals, managed bands, recorded music and is a true Renaissance Artist of our times. Matt’s generation has embraced technology and with it the ability to perform and create across disciplines and to appeal to a broad idea of what is art.

Five Things You Have To Do In Paris (to be continued)

1. Eat at Avant Comptoir in St Germain…the tiny space next to the famous Comptoir serves gourmet French Food Tapas Style. With each dish ranging from 3-8 euros…it is the best way to have the ultimate gourmet et gourmand experience in Paris

2. Stroll along Avenue Montaigne.  For the best in people watching and the plus chic du chic..this is the street. Admire the  opulent mode at Dior, Celine, Chanel and Manoush.  Delight in the way each store carefully curates their collection and their warmth in welcoming you to browse among dresses that cost 2000 euros and up. There is true art in fashion and Avenue Montaigne is the most restrained place to see it.  Handsome men too!

3. Palais de Tokyo.  Of course the Louvre and Musee D’Orsay are must visits with amazing collections…but for the best in curating, pushing the boundaries of contemporary art and great writing..I love the Palais de Tokyo. Discover the genius of Jimmy Robert, Ed Atkins, Steve McQueen, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Camille Henrot…All in One Day!

4. Jardins Albert Kahn.  Just outside Paris but on the subway line is one of the loveliest of gardens du monde. Meander through Japanese gardens, Koi ponds, stone structures, classic french espaliered trees and more. Art is integrated too

5. Pere Lachaise Cemetery You can look for famous writers and musicians…Oscar Wilde, Moliere, Eloise and Abelard, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, Chopin and of course Jim Morrison. it is a world into it’s own, charming, savage, manicured and the section of memorials to those who perished in the Holocaust and died fighting to end WW II is the most moving of all.

Mei Mei Chang’s glossy, inky black layers create emotionally dark and complex undertones in her re-imagined landscape, “Untitled”.  Rows of slightly misshapen triangles float above a distorted circle in brushed grey, while a mound of black and white paint suggests molten, volcanic rock. They appear to be mountains on an island floating in a still, black sea.

However, as an abstracted map, the topographical associations created by the piece reside within the viewer’s mind. The glossy, dark nature of the paint acts as a sort of reservoir to project alternately between meditative calm and subconscious tremblings. As the paint seeps over the edge of the canvas in waves, it also laps at the edges of the mind. Increasingly small details pull the eye further and further inwards, causing the mind to float through its own internal topography.

The small and monochromatic nature of Mei Mei Chang’s psychological landscape greatly rewards a slow and intimate contemplation. The emotional tones of the piece act as a window into the viewer’s own mind and own internal map.


-Schuyler Krogh, Kenyon College ’15

Mei Mei Chang’s glossy, inky black layers create emotionally dark and complex undertones in her re-imagined landscape, “Untitled”.  Rows of slightly misshapen triangles float above a distorted circle in brushed grey, while a mound of black and white paint suggests molten, volcanic rock. They appear to be mountains on an island floating in a still, black sea.

However, as an abstracted map, the topographical associations created by the piece reside within the viewer’s mind. The glossy, dark nature of the paint acts as a sort of reservoir to project alternately between meditative calm and subconscious tremblings. As the paint seeps over the edge of the canvas in waves, it also laps at the edges of the mind. Increasingly small details pull the eye further and further inwards, causing the mind to float through its own internal topography.

The small and monochromatic nature of Mei Mei Chang’s psychological landscape greatly rewards a slow and intimate contemplation. The emotional tones of the piece act as a window into the viewer’s own mind and own internal map.

-Schuyler Krogh, Kenyon College ’15

Pam Frederick
Empty vessels, full of vibrant energy.  
How could such simple forms become so enlivened, so quickened, by color and gesture?  Pam Frederick’s energetic, effusive style seems to suggest the underlying vibrations of the physical world, those which are naturally invisible.  In this way there is a spiritual quality to her painting.  The objects and forms she renders possess a recognizable identity on their own, but maintain a visual relationship to the undifferentiated source from whence they came.  It is expressed here in wild strokes and blotches color that at once seem to overwhelm the “vessels” and also serve as their background.  

Seth Dorcus  MICA  2014

Pam Frederick

Empty vessels, full of vibrant energy.  

How could such simple forms become so enlivened, so quickened, by color and gesture?  Pam Frederick’s energetic, effusive style seems to suggest the underlying vibrations of the physical world, those which are naturally invisible.  In this way there is a spiritual quality to her painting.  The objects and forms she renders possess a recognizable identity on their own, but maintain a visual relationship to the undifferentiated source from whence they came.  It is expressed here in wild strokes and blotches color that at once seem to overwhelm the “vessels” and also serve as their background.  

Seth Dorcus  MICA  2014

Brian Dupont combines found or appropriated writing with oil on aluminum. His Pipe Piece consists of three cylinder aluminum shapes hung vertically.  The rounded surface takes the traditional paint-on-canvas to another level.  The shapes that Dupont creates add dimension to his work.  The art no longer exists solely on the wall.  Once the art comes off the wall, it takes a presence in the room.  To explain why painting on a 3D surface makes the work more intriguing, Dupont says, “all of the sides cannot be viewed simultaneously, and the complete painting can only be comprehended as an abstract construction.”  Dupont’s work can be viewed from many different angles, each of which gives a new perspective on the work.

I was drawn to his work for the ease and pleasure of viewing it. The work is complex in the process but simple in viewing.  The material also make it very intriguing. Dupont’s choice of material reminds me of recycled or found objects.  For this reason, the work as a whole slightly resembles street art with the added painterly touch.  The stencil text and graphic quality enhances this concept further.
Hannah Chertock
Virginia Commonwealth University 2016

Brian Dupont combines found or appropriated writing with oil on aluminum. His Pipe Piece consists of three cylinder aluminum shapes hung vertically.  The rounded surface takes the traditional paint-on-canvas to another level.  The shapes that Dupont creates add dimension to his work.  The art no longer exists solely on the wall.  Once the art comes off the wall, it takes a presence in the room.  To explain why painting on a 3D surface makes the work more intriguing, Dupont says, “all of the sides cannot be viewed simultaneously, and the complete painting can only be comprehended as an abstract construction.”  Dupont’s work can be viewed from many different angles, each of which gives a new perspective on the work.

I was drawn to his work for the ease and pleasure of viewing it. The work is complex in the process but simple in viewing.  The material also make it very intriguing. Dupont’s choice of material reminds me of recycled or found objects.  For this reason, the work as a whole slightly resembles street art with the added painterly touch.  The stencil text and graphic quality enhances this concept further.

Hannah Chertock

Virginia Commonwealth University 2016

Langley Spurlock

I see a body, with a foot for a head.  
There are also white lakes, rivers, streams in this body.  
Warm orange colors suggest a summer day.  
Lines that begin with conviction end suddenly. 
Green patches like verdant fields seen from above
Now it’s not just one body that I see — there are many bodies
Clumsily and delicately arranged
An organic composition, which straddles both spontaneity and regularity


Seth Dorcus  MICA 2014

Langley Spurlock

I see a body, with a foot for a head.  

There are also white lakes, rivers, streams in this body.  

Warm orange colors suggest a summer day.  

Lines that begin with conviction end suddenly. 

Green patches like verdant fields seen from above

Now it’s not just one body that I see — there are many bodies

Clumsily and delicately arranged

An organic composition, which straddles both spontaneity and regularity

Seth Dorcus  MICA 2014