Adah Rose Gallery

Adah Rose Gallery showcases the work of contemporary artists of all medium. We feature duo shows in changing exhibits monthly. We also offer Salons, Zines, Music, Literary events and a lively place to come and talk about and create art. We will be posting event dates, artist bios, musings on the contemporary art world and fabulous places in DC to explore art. We are Francophiles and will be posting about the best places to visit in Paris.
Reading Our Remains
Jessica Drenk
A book is a wonderful thing.  I always look at books one page at a time, but this work by Jessica Drenk lets me see the many layers of an antique tome simultaneously.  It is simply incredible how the excavated pages and text of the book create such intricate  patterns and textures.  Much like her works with PVC piping, this piece transforms, or perhaps reveals, qualities of the medium which mirror the natural world.  The book becomes a fossil- both in terms of its agedness and its petrified appearance.  

Seth Dorcus     MICA  2014

Reading Our Remains

Jessica Drenk

A book is a wonderful thing.  I always look at books one page at a time, but this work by Jessica Drenk lets me see the many layers of an antique tome simultaneously.  It is simply incredible how the excavated pages and text of the book create such intricate  patterns and textures.  Much like her works with PVC piping, this piece transforms, or perhaps reveals, qualities of the medium which mirror the natural world.  The book becomes a fossil- both in terms of its agedness and its petrified appearance.  

Seth Dorcus     MICA  2014

Erosions
Jessica Drenk


In this piece there is less distinction between the natural and the manufactured.  The work is manufactured, to be sure, but its form belies the fact.  Plastic piping would typically seem the furthest thing from the world of nature - though not in this case.  At once we see synthetic material and organic beauty, indoor plumbing and coral reef.  And what is most fascinating perhaps, is that it is neatly framed (“contained” even) and presented for the viewing.  Such a beautiful and paradoxical phenomenon hangs here right here on the wall before me- like some kind of magic.  
Seth Dorcus 2014

Erosions

Jessica Drenk

In this piece there is less distinction between the natural and the manufactured.  The work is manufactured, to be sure, but its form belies the fact.  Plastic piping would typically seem the furthest thing from the world of nature - though not in this case.  At once we see synthetic material and organic beauty, indoor plumbing and coral reef.  And what is most fascinating perhaps, is that it is neatly framed (“contained” even) and presented for the viewing.  Such a beautiful and paradoxical phenomenon hangs here right here on the wall before me- like some kind of magic.  

Seth Dorcus 2014

Alan Steele

Modern Equipment #89 (2012)


Something emerges from this arrangement.  A quiet harmony- between the clean,  delicate format and densely busy linear marks.  It is difficult to say whether or not the orange in the center advances or recedes.  Likewise the fluted paper surface at right adds a subtle three-dimensionality, but it is unclear how…

Peculiar, it might be a doorway, opening toward us.  It might be a machine, some maze-like mechanism.  Hints of text are visible but illegible.  We are left with a beautiful enigma, like life itself.  

Seth Dorcus

Mica 2014

Alan Steele

Modern Equipment #89 (2012)

Something emerges from this arrangement.  A quiet harmony- between the clean,  delicate format and densely busy linear marks.  It is difficult to say whether or not the orange in the center advances or recedes.  Likewise the fluted paper surface at right adds a subtle three-dimensionality, but it is unclear how…

Peculiar, it might be a doorway, opening toward us.  It might be a machine, some maze-like mechanism.  Hints of text are visible but illegible.  We are left with a beautiful enigma, like life itself.  

Seth Dorcus

Mica 2014

In “REFRESH” by Suzanne Yurdin, bold browns, blues and yellow ochres, painted using large planes and overlapping lines and grids create a beguiling abstract landscape.  Suzanne has worked in both Provence in France and Tuscany in Italy to capture the geology, the topography and the brilliance of the color in these two seductive regions where painters through art history have drawn inspiration

In “REFRESH” by Suzanne Yurdin, bold browns, blues and yellow ochres, painted using large planes and overlapping lines and grids create a beguiling abstract landscape.  Suzanne has worked in both Provence in France and Tuscany in Italy to capture the geology, the topography and the brilliance of the color in these two seductive regions where painters through art history have drawn inspiration

Yvette Kraft
Rata Scoo
A few blue lines create a character, one presumably named “Rata Scoo.”  
In this small drawing, a handful of marks coalesce to form a portrait.  “Less is more” is the adage that comes to mind, and in the case of Kraft’s drawing, the words ring true.   Who is Rata Scoo?  Words won’t suffice to say, no matter how deliberate.  But words aren’t necessary, not with these few blue lines.  Who is Rata Scoo?  I can’t say, but I don’t need to - just look.

Seth Dorcus   

MICA 2014

Yvette Kraft

Rata Scoo

A few blue lines create a character, one presumably named “Rata Scoo.”  

In this small drawing, a handful of marks coalesce to form a portrait.  “Less is more” is the adage that comes to mind, and in the case of Kraft’s drawing, the words ring true.   Who is Rata Scoo?  Words won’t suffice to say, no matter how deliberate.  But words aren’t necessary, not with these few blue lines.  Who is Rata Scoo?  I can’t say, but I don’t need to - just look.

Seth Dorcus   

MICA 2014

Pat Goslee

Painting is a healing and holistic act for Pat Goslee; it allows her to internalize exterior pain and pleasure, processing both into compassion and works of art. In her newest series of works on canvas, Pat mines her subconscious and uses her intuition to convey inner realities. Pat’s ideas straddle the disciplines of science, metaphysics and philosophy. She works to create comforting spaces and vibrant energy in each of her works. She often utilizes patterns, including materials dripped in paint and applied directly to the canvas, to create systems that describe how we store information and knowledge. Pat’s paintings are a way of visualizing and transmitting vitality. In her paintings, one sees everything from a beating heart, secret worlds, inner beauty, machines and microscopic organisms. Her palettes are both beautiful and sensitive, serving as a perfect complement to her personal ideology. 

Pat Goslee is a DC-based painter. Pat received her BFA from the University of Georgia and her MFA from Catholic University. Pat has exhibited in many group and solo shows, most recently at Studio 1469, the National Institutes of Health, the DCAC. McLean Project for the Arts, Hillyer Art Space, Doris Mae Gallery, Addison Ripley Fine Art and the Washington Project for the Arts. She serves on the Artist Advisory Board at Hillyer Art Space and has curated numerous shows in the DC metropolitan area. 


Jessica Van Brakle

Cranes - silent yet strong, masculine yet delicate - dominate the contemplative landscapes of Jessica Van Brakle. An homage to her grandfather’s work in construction, the cranes build networks of intricate, expansive lines. In her newest paintings, Jessica’s landscapes have become  more abstract and decorative. On close examination we see the same botanic motifs mixing with new domestic elements. Nature seems to blossom out of the mechanical, resulting in a refined and harmonious whole. The paintings are like fine Wedgwood China; elegant, ornamental and graceful. While the paintings might appear symmetric, Jessica allows the paint to drip and flow, disrupting the apparent perfection. We see a new Rococo influence in her work in addition to her older influences of 19th Century Romantic Landscape painting and photography. 

Jessica Van Brakle is a Maryland-based painter with a studio at the Arlington Art Center. She received her BFA from the Corcoran College of Art & Design in Painting. Jessica is a former Hamiltonian fellow, a recipient of an Individual Artist Grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, and in 2008 was a finalist for the Trawick Prize. Her most recent exhibitions include shows at the Arlington Arts Center, McLean Project for the Arts, Bäckerstrasse 4 in Vienna Austria, Hamiltonian Gallery, Countdown Temporary ArtSpace, in Bethesda, and Silber Gallery at Goucher College, as well as numerous group shows in the DC area. 

 There is something so utterly human, so astoundingly powerful in visiting a museum and standing before a marble sculpture from Greco-Roman times.  I feel so privileged and awed to be in a room with sculpture that is over 2000 years old. I feel a profound connection to the artist who created the sculpture and to the work itself.  My mind tries to recreate the space of the workshop where the artist might have worked, to imagine the personality of the model, to think of the relationship between artist and inspiration.

Standing alone in one of the rooms of the National Gallery of Art in DC or the Louvre in Paris is an amazing pleasure. I often find myself alone, gazing at the anatomy, musculature and carving of a soldier, slave or goddess.  How could the anonymous artist have possibly imagined the solace and enjoyment their art would provide through the millennium?  I am reminded of the vulnerability of us all and of our capacity for immortality through the arts.

I am so proud and delighted by the article in the new Domicile Magazine written by art consultant, artist and all around arts Champion Sharon Burton
Written by Sharon J. Burton / Photographed by Kelly Alfaro

As an art collector, I have been drawn to the Adah Rose Gallery for quite some time by both the quality of artists that are exhibited and its location. It’s not located in D.C. or Baltimore, but in the charming community of suburban Kensington, Maryland, in Montgomery County.
Adah Rose Bitterbaum, a lifelong lover of visual art, founded the gallery in 2011 after a stint with the Studio Gallery in Washington D.C. The Adah Rose Gallery showcases local artists and introduces emerging and mid-career artists based in New York, California, and other parts of the country. Adah also has an affinity for recent MFA graduates in the D.C. metropolitan area and helps launch their careers by showcasing their work in a few exhibitions each year. The gallery recently stepped into the national art fair circuit, exposing their artists to national and international collectors by participating in PULSE Miami in December 2012 and 2013, the Dallas Art Fair in April 2013, and PULSE New York in May 2013.
DomiCile recently met with Adah to learn more about the gallery and the artists showcased there.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU LIVED IN THE AREA?
I have lived in the Washington D.C. area for 24 years. I moved here because my husband, who I met in Boston, was from here.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO OPEN AN ART GALLERY?
I have always loved art and followed the art market since I was in college. I grew up in Europe and my parents took us to museums all the time. I was a history major in college, but studied a great deal of art history as well.
During my freshman year, a professor told me about an artist named Richard Diebenkorn. I saw a lot of his work in Los Angeles and was hooked on contemporary art ever since. I have had many careers: lawyer, public health attorney, college counselor, and teacher. As my kids grew up, I wanted to go back to work full-time and saw an ad on Craigslist for a gallery director. It was pure serendipity—I applied and became the director of Studio Gallery in Dupont Circle for almost four years. I had no intention of opening my own gallery, but I experienced galleries closing in Dupont Circle and thought, “we need more galleries.”

WHY KENSINGTON?
For eight years, I have volunteered at a little shop in Kensington called the Prevention of Blindness shop, where I met an artist, Kaltoum Maroufi, who has been a great supporter and champion of the gallery. She was giving up her space in Kensington and moving to a larger studio. It was so affordable, and the landlady is so lovely,  so I thought, “I need to do this. I will give it three years and see what happens.”

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE ARTISTS YOU REPRESENT IN THE GALLERY?
All the artists I represent are contemporary artists. I have always loved text-based work, so a number of the artists use text, books, and language, or reference literature in their work. Sometimes it is quite obvious, other times less so, but for me, the love of language and literature is often there. I also love work that uses some form of a grid or geometry and that is often present in the work. I am also very loyal to quite a few artists from my days at Studio Gallery, so I may show a couple of their pieces in the gallery. It may not be cutting edge contemporary, but it is fine work and I am delighted to show it.

WITH SO MANY OTHER WAYS FOR PEOPLE TO BUY ART THESE DAYS, HOW IMPORTANT ARE GALLERIES TODAY AS PART OF THE ART MARKET?
I truly believe in galleries. I think artists need to have shows, and magical things happen when work is in the gallery setting. This is true for solo, duo, and group shows. I will have thought about a show for several months, and then all of a sudden a new dynamic that I never intended or thought would happen is created. The gallery also shows work people may not always have a chance to see.

Most importantly, I want to make art important and accessible. Many people who visit the gallery are hesitant to enter; they feel as if they do not understand contemporary art. My goal is always to create a dialogue, to get their ideas, and to tell them a little bit about the artists or my own art. There are some works of art—especially that of Jessica Drenk and John James Anderson—that get people initially talking or thinking about art and that makes me so happy. From their work, I am able to introduce visitors to the work of other artists and help them to think about contemporary art.
WHAT IS THE BEST THING ABOUT OWNING A GALLERY IN THIS AREA?
There are so many wonderful artists working in the area and there are art events all the time. I feel I have learned so much from gallerists, artists, curators, universities, and the museum community. Washington D.C. is also full of intelligent and curious people who always give me a new perspective and language for looking at art.

My little community in Kensington is so generous—a restaurant with great walls lets me hang art, the Kensington Bookstore promotes my events, and the Prevention of Blindness store is generous with supplies. My upstairs neighbor, Ferdynand, who trained as an artist in Poland, helps me to curate and hang shows and we are always talking about twentieth-century art. He has a great eye and great aesthetic. My neighbor and friend Kaltoum, who I mentioned before, is a great teacher of art and a great source of knowledge about art history. She is one of the most enthusiastic supporters of artists and she brought me my first major collector in the gallery. I am truly lucky to be here.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN COLLECTING ART BUT DON’T KNOW WHERE TO START?
If you are interested in collecting art and do not know where to begin, I would visit museums and public art spaces. Glenstone in Potomac, Maryland, is one of the finest private collections of contemporary art and it is free. The National Gallery, Hirshhorn, and Corcoran all have amazing collections. I love the public art spaces and have found the Arlington Arts Center and Hillyer Art Space to be two wonderful places to see both local and national artists. I also love the Katzen Arts Center at American University—they are doing a fantastic job showing contemporary art.

Then, I would begin to see gallery shows. Visit the galleries and places where art is sold—if you see something you like, call the gallery or artist. If you fall in love with a piece of art and can afford it—buy it! It is exciting and you will be so proud. Art is not expensive or does not have to be. I have art in the gallery from $35 to $15,000, but most of it is quite affordable. Many collectors like to concentrate in a certain area, but many are eclectic and buy what they love. In the end, your own taste should dictate what you buy. I know my own tastes have grown and changed so much in the last 10 years. It is exciting to think that art and artists have multiplied in recent years and creativity is so alive and well.

HOW CAN PEOPLE FIND OUT MORE ABOUT YOUR GALLERY?
I always welcome visitors to the gallery and love showing art! A willingness to look is so exciting to me. I do not expect most visitors to purchase art (of course it is always nice when they do). I want people to look and tell me what they think and like. I want them to return and tell me what they have seen outside my gallery and liked (or not liked).

People can, of course, visit the website or view some of the artists’ work online. I love a phone call about work and respond to any inquiries we get. I want people to feel like they are in a bookstore when they are in my gallery—browsing is always encouraged. Stay as long as you like! I want people to feel comfortable and a part of a community at Adah Rose Gallery.

Learn more about Adah Rose Gallery by visiting the website at adahrosegallery.com and the Tumblr site atadahrosegallery.tumblr.com

I am so proud and delighted by the article in the new Domicile Magazine written by art consultant, artist and all around arts Champion Sharon Burton

Written by Sharon J. Burton / Photographed by Kelly Alfaro

As an art collector, I have been drawn to the Adah Rose Gallery for quite some time by both the quality of artists that are exhibited and its location. It’s not located in D.C. or Baltimore, but in the charming community of suburban Kensington, Maryland, in Montgomery County.

Adah Rose Bitterbaum, a lifelong lover of visual art, founded the gallery in 2011 after a stint with the Studio Gallery in Washington D.C. The Adah Rose Gallery showcases local artists and introduces emerging and mid-career artists based in New York, California, and other parts of the country. Adah also has an affinity for recent MFA graduates in the D.C. metropolitan area and helps launch their careers by showcasing their work in a few exhibitions each year. The gallery recently stepped into the national art fair circuit, exposing their artists to national and international collectors by participating in PULSE Miami in December 2012 and 2013, the Dallas Art Fair in April 2013, and PULSE New York in May 2013.

DomiCile recently met with Adah to learn more about the gallery and the artists showcased there.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU LIVED IN THE AREA?

I have lived in the Washington D.C. area for 24 years. I moved here because my husband, who I met in Boston, was from here.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO OPEN AN ART GALLERY?

I have always loved art and followed the art market since I was in college. I grew up in Europe and my parents took us to museums all the time. I was a history major in college, but studied a great deal of art history as well.

During my freshman year, a professor told me about an artist named Richard Diebenkorn. I saw a lot of his work in Los Angeles and was hooked on contemporary art ever since. I have had many careers: lawyer, public health attorney, college counselor, and teacher. As my kids grew up, I wanted to go back to work full-time and saw an ad on Craigslist for a gallery director. It was pure serendipity—I applied and became the director of Studio Gallery in Dupont Circle for almost four years. I had no intention of opening my own gallery, but I experienced galleries closing in Dupont Circle and thought, “we need more galleries.”

WHY KENSINGTON?

For eight years, I have volunteered at a little shop in Kensington called the Prevention of Blindness shop, where I met an artist, Kaltoum Maroufi, who has been a great supporter and champion of the gallery. She was giving up her space in Kensington and moving to a larger studio. It was so affordable, and the landlady is so lovely,  so I thought, “I need to do this. I will give it three years and see what happens.”

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE ARTISTS YOU REPRESENT IN THE GALLERY?

All the artists I represent are contemporary artists. I have always loved text-based work, so a number of the artists use text, books, and language, or reference literature in their work. Sometimes it is quite obvious, other times less so, but for me, the love of language and literature is often there. I also love work that uses some form of a grid or geometry and that is often present in the work. I am also very loyal to quite a few artists from my days at Studio Gallery, so I may show a couple of their pieces in the gallery. It may not be cutting edge contemporary, but it is fine work and I am delighted to show it.

WITH SO MANY OTHER WAYS FOR PEOPLE TO BUY ART THESE DAYS, HOW IMPORTANT ARE GALLERIES TODAY AS PART OF THE ART MARKET?

I truly believe in galleries. I think artists need to have shows, and magical things happen when work is in the gallery setting. This is true for solo, duo, and group shows. I will have thought about a show for several months, and then all of a sudden a new dynamic that I never intended or thought would happen is created. The gallery also shows work people may not always have a chance to see.

Most importantly, I want to make art important and accessible. Many people who visit the gallery are hesitant to enter; they feel as if they do not understand contemporary art. My goal is always to create a dialogue, to get their ideas, and to tell them a little bit about the artists or my own art. There are some works of art—especially that of Jessica Drenk and John James Anderson—that get people initially talking or thinking about art and that makes me so happy. From their work, I am able to introduce visitors to the work of other artists and help them to think about contemporary art.

WHAT IS THE BEST THING ABOUT OWNING A GALLERY IN THIS AREA?

There are so many wonderful artists working in the area and there are art events all the time. I feel I have learned so much from gallerists, artists, curators, universities, and the museum community. Washington D.C. is also full of intelligent and curious people who always give me a new perspective and language for looking at art.

My little community in Kensington is so generous—a restaurant with great walls lets me hang art, the Kensington Bookstore promotes my events, and the Prevention of Blindness store is generous with supplies. My upstairs neighbor, Ferdynand, who trained as an artist in Poland, helps me to curate and hang shows and we are always talking about twentieth-century art. He has a great eye and great aesthetic. My neighbor and friend Kaltoum, who I mentioned before, is a great teacher of art and a great source of knowledge about art history. She is one of the most enthusiastic supporters of artists and she brought me my first major collector in the gallery. I am truly lucky to be here.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN COLLECTING ART BUT DON’T KNOW WHERE TO START?

If you are interested in collecting art and do not know where to begin, I would visit museums and public art spaces. Glenstone in Potomac, Maryland, is one of the finest private collections of contemporary art and it is free. The National Gallery, Hirshhorn, and Corcoran all have amazing collections. I love the public art spaces and have found the Arlington Arts Center and Hillyer Art Space to be two wonderful places to see both local and national artists. I also love the Katzen Arts Center at American University—they are doing a fantastic job showing contemporary art.

Then, I would begin to see gallery shows. Visit the galleries and places where art is sold—if you see something you like, call the gallery or artist. If you fall in love with a piece of art and can afford it—buy it! It is exciting and you will be so proud. Art is not expensive or does not have to be. I have art in the gallery from $35 to $15,000, but most of it is quite affordable. Many collectors like to concentrate in a certain area, but many are eclectic and buy what they love. In the end, your own taste should dictate what you buy. I know my own tastes have grown and changed so much in the last 10 years. It is exciting to think that art and artists have multiplied in recent years and creativity is so alive and well.

HOW CAN PEOPLE FIND OUT MORE ABOUT YOUR GALLERY?

I always welcome visitors to the gallery and love showing art! A willingness to look is so exciting to me. I do not expect most visitors to purchase art (of course it is always nice when they do). I want people to look and tell me what they think and like. I want them to return and tell me what they have seen outside my gallery and liked (or not liked).

People can, of course, visit the website or view some of the artists’ work online. I love a phone call about work and respond to any inquiries we get. I want people to feel like they are in a bookstore when they are in my gallery—browsing is always encouraged. Stay as long as you like! I want people to feel comfortable and a part of a community at Adah Rose Gallery.

Learn more about Adah Rose Gallery by visiting the website at adahrosegallery.com and the Tumblr site atadahrosegallery.tumblr.com

I am honored to be one of the co-curators with the excellent Harriet Lesser of this all Member show..Strathmore is a gem of an exhibition space and venue for music and dance.
The 23rd Annual Strathmore Artists Juried ExhibitionMarch 8, 2014 - April 6, 2014
Exhibition HoursTuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday - 10AM-4PMWednesday - 10AM-9PMClosed MondayFrom a pool of more than 200 elite artists and artisans known as the Strathmore Artists, 70 artists were juried into this exhibit. Paintings, drawings, photographs; wood, fiber, metal; sculptured glass, ceramics and mixed media: the eclectic entries and their quality make this exhibition a favorite year after year.Please join us for the following programs, presented in conjunction with the exhibit:CHILDREN’S TALK AND TOUR March 15ART TALK FOR ADULTS March 15

I am honored to be one of the co-curators with the excellent Harriet Lesser of this all Member show..Strathmore is a gem of an exhibition space and venue for music and dance.

The 23rd Annual Strathmore Artists Juried Exhibition
March 8, 2014 - April 6, 2014

Exhibition Hours
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday - 10AM-4PM
Wednesday - 10AM-9PM
Closed Monday

From a pool of more than 200 elite artists and artisans known as the Strathmore Artists, 70 artists were juried into this exhibit. Paintings, drawings, photographs; wood, fiber, metal; sculptured glass, ceramics and mixed media: the eclectic entries and their quality make this exhibition a favorite year after year.

Please join us for the following programs, presented in conjunction with the exhibit:

CHILDREN’S TALK AND TOUR March 15
ART TALK FOR ADULTS March 15

I am honored to be one of the Curators for this very wonderful show

     
 
Alchemical Vessels 2014
Benefit: Friday, May 2 (By Contribution Only)
 
Visit www.smithcenter.org/benefit to make your contribution!
 
With over 100 new artists hand-picked by 20 of D.C.’s most prominent curators, Smith Center's second annual Benefit provides the opportunity to add one or more of the 125 Alchemical Vessels to your art collection! By making a Benefit-Vessel Contribution starting TOMORROW at 10am, you will gain access to the exclusive Benefit Event and be given the opportunity to select one of the featured fine art vessels with selection priority determined by the order in which you make your contribution online. In other words, the earlier you contribute, the greater your selection of the vessels will be! 100% of the proceeds will go toward Smith Center’s cancer support programs.
 
Please Note: Each Benefit-Vessel contribution admits one (1) guest to the exclusive Benefit Event on May 2nd, but if you would like to bring a guest please click here to make a Benefit-Only contribution ($50 per person). The Benefit-Only contribution provides one (1) person access to the May 2nd Benefit Event without the selection of one of the exhibited vessels.
 
Alchemical Vessels brings together 125 artists and 20 invited curators for a community dialogue on healing and transformation through the arts. Each artist has been asked to transform a simple ceramic bowl by means of his or her own personal aesthetic and medium, drawing inspiration from the bowl as a place of holding, community, sacred space, and the alchemical vessel. The ceramic bowl was selected as the fundamental element of the exhibition to symbolize creating a space where healing can take place—an idea at the heart of Smith Center's work and mission. Metaphorically speaking, Smith Center—the space and the work we do within our walls—resembles an alchemical vessel. People bring their everyday burdens, fears, and pains to us, and in this place of holding, we help transform those elements into hope, wisdom and strength. 

Alchemical Vessels will run April 4th thru May 16th, with the Opening Reception on Friday, April 4, 7-9pm. To learn more about the Exhibition, May 2nd Benefit & Sponsorship Opportunities please visit www.smithcenter.org/benefit.
 
Artists: Eames Armstrong, Sardar Aziz, Karen Baer, Beth Baldwin, Michele Banks, Joseph Barbaccia, Carolyn Becker, Jessica Beels, Joan Belmar, Lori Anne Boocks, Anne Bouie, Amy Braden, Julia Brown, Karen O. Brown, Larry Brown, Amanda Burnham, Lenny Campello, Shanthi Chandrasekar, Mei Mei Chang, Peter Charles, Asma Chaudhary, Travis Childers, Eunmee Chung, Wesley Clark, Michael Corigliano, Sheila Crider, Candy Cummings, Anna U. Davis, Rosetta DeBerardinis, Tamara De Silva, Elsabe Dixon, Joel D’Orazio, David D’Orio, Chelsea S. Dobert-Kehn, Thomas Drymon, Nekisha Durrett, Victor Ekpuk, Laura Elkins, Dana Ellyn, Erica Benay Fallin, Felisa Federman, Jeremy Flick, Suzi Fox, Barbara Frank, Nancy Frankel, Shaunté Gates, Dawn Gavin, Bita Ghavami, Aziza Claudia Gibson-Hunter, Melissa Glasser, Janis Goodman, Pat Goslee, Sherill Anne Gross, John Grunwell, Nelson Gutierrez, Kristen Hayes, Eve Hennessa, Sean Hennessey, Linda Hesh, Matt Hollis, Leslie Holt, Jessica Hopkins, Karen Hubacher, Monica Jahan Bose, Barbara Johnson, Wayson R. Jones, J’Nell Jordan, Mila Kagan, Sumita Kim, Joan Konkel, Yar Koporulin, Walter Kravitz, Kate Kretz, Randall Lear, Heather Levy, Yue Li, Nathan Loda, Armando Lopez-Bircann, Laurel Lukaszewski, James Mahoney, J.J. McCracken, Donald McCray, Jayme Mclellen, Tendani Mpulubusi El, Komelia Okim, Amie Oliver, Luis Peralta, Michael Platt, Maryanne Pollock, Lynn Putney, Maria-Lana Queen, Beverly Ress, Kim Reyes, Glenn Richardson, Marie Ringwald, Amber Robles-Gordon, Pam Rogers, Lisa Rosenstein, Nicole Salimbene, Samantha Sethi, Matt Sesow, Amy Sherald, Shahin Shikhaliyev, Ellen Sinel, Casey Snyder, Susan Stacks, Dafna Steinberg, Jennifer Strunge, Lynn Sures, Lynn Sylvester, Ira Tattelman, Christine Buckton Tilman, Erwin Timmers, Ben Tolman, Novie Trump, Shinji Turner-Yamamoto, Laurie Tylec, Michael Verdon, Jodi Walsh, Jenny Walton, Ellyn Weiss, Stephanie Williams, Audrey Wilson, Sharon Wolpoff, & Carmen C. Wong.
 
Curators: Peggy Cooper Cafritz, Educator, Philanthropist & Founder of D.C.’s Duke Ellington School for the Arts | Jarvis DuBois, Independent Curator & Principal at J. DuBois Arts | Monica Jahan Bose, Artist & Activist | Anne L’Ecuyer, Arts Management Faculty at American University | Camille Mosley-Pasley, Photographer & Principal at Pasley Place Photography | B.G. Muhn, Professor of Art, Georgetown University | Michael O’Sullivan, Art Critic for The Washington Post | Dr. Frederick P. Ognibene, M.D., NIH Physician, Fine Art Collector & Past Board Chair, Washington Project for the Arts | Michael Platt, Artist & Professor at Howard University | Jennifer Riddell, Writer & Interpretive Projects Manager at the National Gallery of Art | Adah Rose, Principal at Adah Rose Gallery | Laura Roulet, Independent Curator & Writer | Molly Ruppert, Artist & Gallery Director at the Warehouse Theater | Terry Scott, Cultural Organizer & Independent Curator | Judy J. Sherman, Art Consultant & Principal at j. fine art | Thomas Stanley, Professor at George Mason University | Nuzhat Sultan, Independent Curator | Tim Tate, Artist & Co-Director of Washington Glass School | R.L. Tillman, Artist, Teacher & Curator | Dolly Vehlow, Fine Art Collector & Principal at Gallery O on H