Adah Rose Gallery

Adah Rose Gallery showcases the work of contemporary artists of all medium. We feature duo shows in changing exhibits monthly. We also offer Salons, Zines, Music, Literary events and a lively place to come and talk about and create art. We will be posting event dates, artist bios, musings on the contemporary art world and fabulous places in DC to explore art. We are Francophiles and will be posting about the best places to visit in Paris.
Ian Delaney Doherty
Stripes (2005)

A late night television screen flickering
Diluted lights on the horizon at bedtime
The work of a skilled abstract painter
A city whizzing by at night
Compact neon layering 
Pretty geological segments 
An exotic pinstripe suit

Seth Dorcus   Maryland Institute College of Art  2014

Ian Delaney Doherty

Stripes (2005)

A late night television screen flickering

Diluted lights on the horizon at bedtime

The work of a skilled abstract painter

A city whizzing by at night

Compact neon layering 

Pretty geological segments 

An exotic pinstripe suit

Seth Dorcus  Maryland Institute College of Art  2014

“Three Floors and a Roof” -  Maggie Gourlay

 “Three Floors and a Roof” are three screen prints on paper depicting the layout of the floors of a house. The background is a beautiful Moroccan print that fades through darker and lighter shades. The focus of each of the three pieces are blueprint like images of floors, originally made out of string but now printed onto the paper. The floors are so perfectly meticulous that it is easy to imagine someone remembering there childhood home. However as the string ends it leaves an invitation for more memories and ideas to enter. The shadow of these blue prints gives the illusion of a floating room, an idea shifting and evolving, similar to the way these pieces are created. A feeling of happiness and nostalgia comes from these stunning pieces.


  - Natalie Richard Montgomery HS ‘18

“Three Floors and a Roof” -  Maggie Gourlay

 “Three Floors and a Roof” are three screen prints on paper depicting the layout of the floors of a house. The background is a beautiful Moroccan print that fades through darker and lighter shades. The focus of each of the three pieces are blueprint like images of floors, originally made out of string but now printed onto the paper. The floors are so perfectly meticulous that it is easy to imagine someone remembering there childhood home. However as the string ends it leaves an invitation for more memories and ideas to enter. The shadow of these blue prints gives the illusion of a floating room, an idea shifting and evolving, similar to the way these pieces are created. A feeling of happiness and nostalgia comes from these stunning pieces.

  - Natalie Richard Montgomery HS ‘18

Our gallery is “user friendly”. We embrace technology, books, fonts, logos, music, film, aesthetics, signage, drawing, painting, screen printing, sculpture, computers and photography. We want to create a shared idea of culture and a broad one..we value your ideas, comments, and critiques, we are a place of dialogue, humor, seriousness and lightheartedness. Your aesthetic is ours…we hope ours is yours.The gallery is three years old this week. We have been privileged to show art in our gallery space, in restaurants, law firms, boutiques, kitchen stores and the living rooms of great friends. We have traveled to art fairs in New York, Miami, Dallas and soon California. We have sold art to novices, to collectors and to people who never knew they were collectors but have become so.  

We are lucky and charmed. We are amazed and gratified.  Thank you to all the artists, patrons, visitors and supporters of Adah Rose Gallery. And of course…to all my interns..you have taught me so much and most of all made it fun!

CARTE BLANCHE: SETH, HANNAH AND SCHUYLER

JULY 17-AUGUST 17, 2014

VERNISSAGE THURSDAY JULY 17 6:30-8:30

THE INTERNS OF ADAH ROSE GALLERY HAILING FROM MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART, VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY AND KENYON COLLEGE CURATE AN EXHIBIT WITH WORKS AS DIVERSE AS FIGURATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY, STEEL SCULPTURE, STIPPLED MINIATURES, TEXT BASED ART, FROLICSOME ILLUSTRATIONS, NEON CONSTRUCTIONS AND TOILET PAPER
.

Michael Callaghan, Fire
It’s a careful marriage of pattern and spontaneity.  Callaghan’s Fire, a natural beauty, has a calm but powerful constitution.  Like the “quiet fire” of Bill Evan’s piano, this work is brilliant, but tempered.  Rows of tape have been used by the artist to construct a grid on the canvas.  The additive creates dimension and weight that are reinforced by a nearly monochromatic palette.  Though at close proximity, one can see the vibrant yellow of the flame peeking through - the painting is not as monochromatic as it may have seemed.  It becomes questionable whether the static grid is the foundation for the flame in this work, or vice versa.  Ultimately it doesn’t matter which came first, for now they go together, and do so wonderfully.  

Seth Dorcus    MICA  2014     

Michael Callaghan, Fire

It’s a careful marriage of pattern and spontaneity.  Callaghan’s Fire, a natural beauty, has a calm but powerful constitution.  Like the “quiet fire” of Bill Evan’s piano, this work is brilliant, but tempered.  Rows of tape have been used by the artist to construct a grid on the canvas.  The additive creates dimension and weight that are reinforced by a nearly monochromatic palette.  Though at close proximity, one can see the vibrant yellow of the flame peeking through - the painting is not as monochromatic as it may have seemed.  It becomes questionable whether the static grid is the foundation for the flame in this work, or vice versa.  Ultimately it doesn’t matter which came first, for now they go together, and do so wonderfully.  

Seth Dorcus   MICA  2014     

Lori Anne Boocks’ series “Small Boxes…Some on Fire” demonstrates striking earthly colors, lively brush strokes and underlying layers of text.  The pairing of these paintings makes you think about the spacing and size of the colored boxes.  When you pair just two of Lori’s paintings together, they begin this conversation about containment verses freedom.  This work makes me think about the environment of the boxes meaning the surrounding text, colors and brush strokes.  Parts of the work gives me sense of freedom because of her loose brush strokes, but it seems like she is demonstrating a struggle for freedom.  The boxes seem to be a symbol for containment and isolation.  The colors within the boxes have not fully blended in with the surrounding environment.  Even the text looks different when inside the box verses when outside the box.  While the text is illegible, it allows me a personal connection to the work.  
Hannah Chertock 
Virginia Commonwealth University 2016

Lori Anne Boocks’ series “Small Boxes…Some on Fire” demonstrates striking earthly colors, lively brush strokes and underlying layers of text.  The pairing of these paintings makes you think about the spacing and size of the colored boxes.  When you pair just two of Lori’s paintings together, they begin this conversation about containment verses freedom.  This work makes me think about the environment of the boxes meaning the surrounding text, colors and brush strokes.  Parts of the work gives me sense of freedom because of her loose brush strokes, but it seems like she is demonstrating a struggle for freedom.  The boxes seem to be a symbol for containment and isolation.  The colors within the boxes have not fully blended in with the surrounding environment.  Even the text looks different when inside the box verses when outside the box.  While the text is illegible, it allows me a personal connection to the work.  

Hannah Chertock 

Virginia Commonwealth University 2016

Here is a photograph of one of the walls Seth, Schuyler and I curated for the Summer show which is currently up in the Gallery.  When curating this wall, we were thinking about color, textures and interactions between artworks.  Starting on the lefthand side, we compiled smaller works of Pat Goslee and Ellyn Weiss.  This arrangement of smaller works keeps the eye busy jumping from square to square.  We paired these works with Brian Dupont’s Pipe Piece which brings the art even further off the wall.

Continuing our theme of vivid blacks and bold marks, we placed Joan Belmar’s work next to Nancy Frankel’s metal floor sculpture.  These pieces respond very well next to each other because they all have such strong textures which further enhance each piece.

As your eye continues down the wall, we brought in an element of Japanese art with Freda Lee McCann and Allen Steele.  Both works contain Japanese writing.  McCann’s landscape painting brings out the pinks in Brian and Pat’s work.  Below Alan Steele’s painting we have one of Mei Mei Chang’s mixed media works.  Mei Mei’s jagged edges and diverse materials give a nice transition into my abstract silver gelatin photograms paired with tiled photographs.  Lastly, we have Susan Stack’s gold circular pen on paper piece.  This gold color ties the rest of the wall together as you continue further to the right.  To see more pictures of the show, visit AdahRoseGallery.com

Hannah Chertock

VCU 2016

Here is a photograph of one of the walls Seth, Schuyler and I curated for the Summer show which is currently up in the Gallery.  When curating this wall, we were thinking about color, textures and interactions between artworks.  Starting on the lefthand side, we compiled smaller works of Pat Goslee and Ellyn Weiss.  This arrangement of smaller works keeps the eye busy jumping from square to square.  We paired these works with Brian Dupont’s Pipe Piece which brings the art even further off the wall.

Continuing our theme of vivid blacks and bold marks, we placed Joan Belmar’s work next to Nancy Frankel’s metal floor sculpture.  These pieces respond very well next to each other because they all have such strong textures which further enhance each piece.

As your eye continues down the wall, we brought in an element of Japanese art with Freda Lee McCann and Allen Steele.  Both works contain Japanese writing.  McCann’s landscape painting brings out the pinks in Brian and Pat’s work.  Below Alan Steele’s painting we have one of Mei Mei Chang’s mixed media works.  Mei Mei’s jagged edges and diverse materials give a nice transition into my abstract silver gelatin photograms paired with tiled photographs.  Lastly, we have Susan Stack’s gold circular pen on paper piece.  This gold color ties the rest of the wall together as you continue further to the right.  To see more pictures of the show, visit AdahRoseGallery.com

Hannah Chertock

VCU 2016

I have to admit, “The Spell” by Chandi Kelley grabbed me from my first day at Adah Rose Gallery, and not for the normal “high brow” art analysis reasons. Growing up, there were very few things I loved more than unicorns, witches, and fantastical worlds filled with magic. Now, botanical prints like the wallpaper in this photograph fill my own decor.  Needless to say, this was a very personally, individually pleasing piece.
However, the more I have stayed with this photograph, the more I find thoughtful and subtle layers to this playful piece.
Visually, it’s a study in how a symmetrical, balanced composition can stay dynamic when the artist applies the rule of thirds. (The rule is easy shorthand for the principal of keeping elements in a piece along invisible lines that divide the composition into thirds both horizontally and vertically.) The different poses in the two unicorn bookends keep a sense of movement by not being too perfectly symmetrical. The bright, high contrast pattern in the background adds further visual dynamism.
Intellectually, the photograph is a portrait without being a portrait. Domestic environments can be just as revealing about their owner as that owner’s face, and this photograph does a wonderful job of capturing an aspect of that person’s personality. It’s remarkably easy to feel as if one already knows the owner of this bookshelf. To delve a little deeper, the photograph speaks to how our texts inform our identities; the books are arranged with a level of care and intention that suggest how formative they were to the owner. They’re the kind of books that create a portrait all their own.
Schuyler Krogh Kenyon College 2015

I have to admit, “The Spell” by Chandi Kelley grabbed me from my first day at Adah Rose Gallery, and not for the normal “high brow” art analysis reasons. Growing up, there were very few things I loved more than unicorns, witches, and fantastical worlds filled with magic. Now, botanical prints like the wallpaper in this photograph fill my own decor.  Needless to say, this was a very personally, individually pleasing piece.

However, the more I have stayed with this photograph, the more I find thoughtful and subtle layers to this playful piece.

Visually, it’s a study in how a symmetrical, balanced composition can stay dynamic when the artist applies the rule of thirds. (The rule is easy shorthand for the principal of keeping elements in a piece along invisible lines that divide the composition into thirds both horizontally and vertically.) The different poses in the two unicorn bookends keep a sense of movement by not being too perfectly symmetrical. The bright, high contrast pattern in the background adds further visual dynamism.

Intellectually, the photograph is a portrait without being a portrait. Domestic environments can be just as revealing about their owner as that owner’s face, and this photograph does a wonderful job of capturing an aspect of that person’s personality. It’s remarkably easy to feel as if one already knows the owner of this bookshelf. To delve a little deeper, the photograph speaks to how our texts inform our identities; the books are arranged with a level of care and intention that suggest how formative they were to the owner. They’re the kind of books that create a portrait all their own.

Schuyler Krogh Kenyon College 2015

Thunder and Mist
Freda Lee McCann’s work, “Thunder and Mist,” pays homage to a rich and vast tradition of Chinese landscape painting (termed “shanshui” or “mountains and waters”)while reinterpreting it for contemporary times.  Her techniques are recognizable but new.
The white mist, traditionally called “flying white” and used to allow space for qi to flow and mountains to breathe, was typically created through carefully leaving areas of the painting blank. Here, Freda instead uses watercolor and rice paper, a technique that gives these spaces a new texture and depth.
Her training and skill as a traditional calligrapher are evident in every line of the work. The calligraphic lines of the soaring mountains create energy and movement, while what at first appears to be foliage is really a display of gestural ink work and beautifully wrought Chinese characters.
Additionally, Freda incorporates scraps of phonebook pages on which she practiced her calligraphy. These pieces offer a glimpse into the painstaking practice and repetition necessary to join an art tradition that once taught its students through having them copy all of the great masters who came before. Now, that practices becomes a visual and textural layer of her painting.
-Schuyler Krogh, Kenyon College ’15

Thunder and Mist

Freda Lee McCann’s work, “Thunder and Mist,” pays homage to a rich and vast tradition of Chinese landscape painting (termed “shanshui” or “mountains and waters”)while reinterpreting it for contemporary times.  Her techniques are recognizable but new.

The white mist, traditionally called “flying white” and used to allow space for qi to flow and mountains to breathe, was typically created through carefully leaving areas of the painting blank. Here, Freda instead uses watercolor and rice paper, a technique that gives these spaces a new texture and depth.

Her training and skill as a traditional calligrapher are evident in every line of the work. The calligraphic lines of the soaring mountains create energy and movement, while what at first appears to be foliage is really a display of gestural ink work and beautifully wrought Chinese characters.

Additionally, Freda incorporates scraps of phonebook pages on which she practiced her calligraphy. These pieces offer a glimpse into the painstaking practice and repetition necessary to join an art tradition that once taught its students through having them copy all of the great masters who came before. Now, that practices becomes a visual and textural layer of her painting.

-Schuyler Krogh, Kenyon College ’15

Five Things You Have to Do if you Visit Paris

1. Wander in the Marais and marvel that this part of the city was saved including the beautiful Hotel Particuliers.  Enter the most grand of them all..Les Archives.  

2. Stroll through the courtyards of the Louvre at night, the illuminations are so startling and romantic and there is sure to be a classical music troupe playing for your enjoyment. Tip them to be sure.

3. Visit Shakespeare and Co. along the banks of the Seine. Leave a rendez vous note for a loved one, buy a book or novel about Paris and if you are lucky, stay to hear an inspiring writer talk about their work. In July the NYU in writing program offers a host of readings.

4. Walk along the Quai on the Left Bank to read the elegant signs remembering the famous who have lived in Paris “Ici a vecu” including this romantic quote by Baudelaire. La Crepescule

5. Find an Yves Klein painting and alllow yourself to be absorbed by the sensuous and soothing blue…a color favored in Paris in doorways, fabrics et le ciel.